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Starwolf





Spider-Man is all about using his powers responsibly, right? My question is, can he really do that as part of the New Avengers? So far, they are avoiding the Mighty Avengers, SHIELD and Brother Voodoo. Yes, they are fighting ninjas, but I'm a little hazy on what's responsible about that?

Now, "One More Day" might resolve Spider-Man's fugitive status, but he really can't use his powers in a heroic fashion if he is constantly running and hiding. Now, this might be a problem with all the Spider-Man books right now post-Civil War, but it seems to be worse in New Avengers.

Anyone agree? Disagree? This isn't saying I don't like Spider-Man in the Avengers or that I don't like Bendis writing him. It just seems to me that Peter Parker has never been the run and hide type. He had to do that too often before he got his powers so bullies wouldn't pound him.


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BlakGard




> Spider-Man is all about using his powers responsibly, right? My
> question is, can he really do that as part of the New Avengers? So
> far, they are avoiding the Mighty Avengers, SHIELD and Brother
> Voodoo. Yes, they are fighting ninjas, but I'm a little hazy on
> what's responsible about that?

Absolutely he can be responsible as a part of the New Avengers. Being responsible isn't about obeying the law. It's about doing the right thing. And how is rescuing someone who has been kidnapped not responsible?

> Now, "One More Day" might resolve Spider-Man's fugitive status, but
> he really can't use his powers in a heroic fashion if he is
> constantly running and hiding. Now, this might be a problem with all
> the Spider-Man books right now post-Civil War, but it seems to be
> worse in New Avengers.

Sure he can. He's been doing the same thing for years and years.
____________________



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spiderprince




>
> Spider-Man is all about using his powers responsibly, right? My question is, can he really do that as part of the New Avengers? So far, they are avoiding the Mighty Avengers, SHIELD and Brother Voodoo. Yes, they are fighting ninjas, but I'm a little hazy on what's responsible about that?
>
> Now, "One More Day" might resolve Spider-Man's fugitive status, but he really can't use his powers in a heroic fashion if he is constantly running and hiding. Now, this might be a problem with all the Spider-Man books right now post-Civil War, but it seems to be worse in New Avengers.
>
> Anyone agree? Disagree? This isn't saying I don't like Spider-Man in the Avengers or that I don't like Bendis writing him. It just seems to me that Peter Parker has never been the run and hide type. He had to do that too often before he got his powers so bullies wouldn't pound him.


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Jon Y.




> Being responsible isn't about obeying the law. It's about doing
> the right thing.

And who decides what the right thing is? If Dr Doom feels that running the world - by force if need be - for humanity's own good is the right thing to do, is he being responsible?

Red lights, income taxes, jury duty, putting your garbage out on the right days... in your everyday living, do you only obey the laws you agree with? Or do you also obey the ones you don't necessarily see a point to, but agree to follow because you trust they exist for a reason (usually, the good of society)

The message Marvel is trying to send via Civil War is that you shouldn't have to obey laws if you don't want to. And I don't know about anyone else, but that's a pretty dangerous message to be sending kids.

Thank God kids no longer read these things. \=\)


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dave




> > Being responsible isn't about obeying the law. It's about doing
> > the right thing.
>
> And who decides what the right thing is? If Dr Doom feels that running the world - by force if need be - for humanity's own good is the right thing to do, is he being responsible?
>
> Red lights, income taxes, jury duty, putting your garbage out on the right days... in your everyday living, do you only obey the laws you agree with? Or do you also obey the ones you don't necessarily see a point to, but agree to follow because you trust they exist for a reason (usually, the good of society)
>

So Jim Crow was for the good of society? Our country was founded on disobeying the law because it was unjustice. Otherwise, we'd still be a colony. I think his point was just that right and wrong aren't always the same thing as popular opinion.

> The message Marvel is trying to send via Civil War is that you shouldn't have to obey laws if you don't want to. And I don't know about anyone else, but that's a pretty dangerous message to be sending kids.
>

Being locked up without a trial? Having a selective, involuntary military draft? Creating murderous cyborg clones? How many laws did SHIELD break that week? It works both ways. That was the problem with the SHRA and Civil War. Neither side made sense.

Interestingly, I don't think anyone has brought up the point that perhaps the anti-SHRA guys weren't breaking the law. It has yet to be brought up in court, but having an international police force control American citizens and kick in their doors has to cross some kind of federal protections. People act like Cap's group was just fighting for vigilantism, but super people were being arrested in their homes before they could ever committ that crime. Why should I have to register with the gov't and be forced into the military just because I ended up with powers against my will?


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BlakGard




> > Being responsible isn't about obeying the law. It's about doing
> > the right thing.
>
> And who decides what the right thing is? If Dr Doom feels that running
> the world - by force if need be - for humanity's own good is the right
> thing to do, is he being responsible?

Such a scenario couldn't possibly exist, so no.

> Red lights, income taxes, jury duty, putting your garbage out on the
> right days... in your everyday living, do you only obey the laws you
> agree with? Or do you also obey the ones you don't necessarily see a
> point to, but agree to follow because you trust they exist for a
> reason (usually, the good of society)

Only the laws I agree with, which just so happens to be the vast majority of them. Red lights? I obey them, but not if the signal is broken or someone's life is on the line. Income taxes? Tentatively, but sure. Jury duty? Yes, unless, of course, I couldn't afford it, then I would flip them off. There are a great many crimes--both felonies and misdemeanors--that I'm proud as a heck to commit on a constant basis, and many more that I'd be glad to commit if the circumstances warrant it.

> The message Marvel is trying to send via Civil War is that you
> shouldn't have to obey laws if you don't want to. And I don't know
> about anyone else, but that's a pretty dangerous message to be
> sending kids.
>
> Thank God kids no longer read these things. \=\)

I disagree. And please, kids are already getting from TV, movies, video games, and classic literature everything they've ever gotten from comics, and probably more.
____________________



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Super Rubbery Bung




> > Being responsible isn't about obeying the law. It's about doing
> > the right thing.
>
> And who decides what the right thing is? If Dr Doom feels that running the world - by force if need be - for humanity's own good is the right thing to do, is he being responsible?
>
Heroes who have saved the world at great risk do have more right than a politician who probably works from election to election. They are not comparable to Dr Doom.

> Red lights, income taxes, jury duty, putting your garbage out on the right days... in your everyday living, do you only obey the laws you agree with? Or do you also obey the ones you don't necessarily see a point to, but agree to follow because you trust they exist for a reason (usually, the good of society)
>

Not all laws are ever obeyed by all people. A law abiding person is someone who doesn't break laws, not one who toes the line with everything called a regulation. Most offences are minor and punished accordingly, or simply let off. I'm not having a cape killer chase me because I put on some spandex!

> The message Marvel is trying to send via Civil War is that you shouldn't have to obey laws if you don't want to. And I don't know about anyone else, but that's a pretty dangerous message to be sending kids.
>
The entire SHRA is about licensing- tell me, how many kids are out there driving without a licence?

> Thank God kids no longer read these things. \=\)


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