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Jared






In case it's not obvious by now, I'm a big fan of Budiansky's original series. I've already stated my opinion on the subject, so I won't repeat it here, unless someone asks me to.

But I was wondering what the opinions of other posters were. Did it get what it deserved? Did it suck eggs? Was it an excellent idea with bad execution? Was it a very good title that just flew under the radar? Was it unfairly tarred by the perception that it was supposed to be "Sandman done right"?

Any and all opinions are welcome and encouraged.


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Bryan D





>
> In case it's not obvious by now, I'm a big fan of Budiansky's original series. I've already stated my opinion on the subject, so I won't repeat it here, unless someone asks me to.
>
> But I was wondering what the opinions of other posters were. Did it get what it deserved? Did it suck eggs? Was it an excellent idea with bad execution? Was it a very good title that just flew under the radar? Was it unfairly tarred by the perception that it was supposed to be "Sandman done right"?
>
> Any and all opinions are welcome and encouraged.

I never had the impression that the series was supposed to be "sand man done right" Sand Man was pretty alright on its own.

I thought it was its own deal. Sure they shared dreams in common, but it never glared at me as trying to do what Sandman did. I mean your talking about painted covers, neil gaimen, and more of a play on horror comics.

SpleepWalker always was a super hero book IMO. The nature of a character with dream based powers invites a certain amount of weirdness. But i always felt it was trying to be an original superhero book, and not a noir emo inspiring horror comic with edge.

I always liked it, and I'd place behind New Warriors and Darkhawk as one of my fav 90s books.




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BlakGard




> In case it's not obvious by now, I'm a big fan of Budiansky's
> original series. I've already stated my opinion on the subject, so I
> won't repeat it here, unless someone asks me to.
>
> But I was wondering what the opinions of other posters were. Did it
> get what it deserved? Did it suck eggs? Was it an excellent idea
> with bad execution? Was it a very good title that just flew under
> the radar? Was it unfairly tarred by the perception that it was
> supposed to be "Sandman done right"?
>
> Any and all opinions are welcome and encouraged.

Not sure about whoever thought it was supposed to be "Sandman done right," but those people should probably have the guys from Trading Spaces invade their homes and wallpaper every room with the Sandman that was already done right.

Anyway... I bought the first 3 issues of Sleepwalker, and just couldn't get into it for the life of me. It's one of the few comics I ended up literally throwing in the trash.
____________________




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FirstChAoS




It's odd, Ipicked up the first few issues of sleepwalker (and of darkhawk too) and neither really made much of an impression on me.

In the 90's when I was a teen and first got into comics I didn't have much money. If I bought one of those marvel Universe handbook folders itblew all the comic money for the week. And I regret buying a double of a few comics my brother saidwould be money as they cut into that weeks spending. This limited me to my core series (New Warriors, Guardians of the Galaxy, X-factor), and a few occasionals (Spiderman, Hulk, the other X-books).

My impression of Sleepwalker was interesting concept but i couldn't get into it. My impression of Darkhawk was similar (though I was annoyed by the lack of clues as to what was under that mask).


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Cornelius




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> In case it's not obvious by now, I'm a big fan of Budiansky's original series. I've already stated my opinion on the subject, so I won't repeat it here, unless someone asks me to.

I just wanted to thank you for your reply last week on the subject of SLEEPWALKER. I never got a chance to respond.

> But I was wondering what the opinions of other posters were. Did it get what it deserved? Did it suck eggs? Was it an excellent idea with bad execution? Was it a very good title that just flew under the radar? Was it unfairly tarred by the perception that it was supposed to be "Sandman done right"?

I wonder where SANDMAN done right comes from. NOT BRAND ECHH? That's asinine to the nth degree. Oh well, I suppose hype often is. Anything to get your attention for a moment!

> Any and all opinions are welcome and encouraged.

I'm going to check out any issues I see, especially if they're blessed with Blevins. Thanks again.

Corn
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Reading: HARVEY COMICS CLASSIC: CASPER THE FRIENDLY GHOST, BLACK CANARY ARCHIVES, THE ETERNALS hardback, HOUSE OF MYSTERY SHOWCASE vol. 2 and THE LOVERS by Phillip Jose Farmer.
Listening: K.D. Lang, Loretta Lynn, Judy Garland, Air and the White Stripes.
Watching: THE DAILY SHOW and HOGAN'S HEROES (for Klink and Schultz.)
Saw: THE PILLOWMAN (play.)



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Son of Hulk




The current is boring now as it is back then. One of the worst characters Marvel created and they created alot of bad characters in the 90's. Sleepwalker is one of them. Others that I can name include Darkhawk, Rage and most of the other New Warriors except for the founding members. Ultra Girl is the exception to the rule, loved her 3-issue miniseries in 96.


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Michael Jung




>
>
> In case it's not obvious by now, I'm a big fan of Budiansky's original series. I've already stated my opinion on the subject, so I won't repeat it here, unless someone asks me to.
>
> But I was wondering what the opinions of other posters were. Did it get what it deserved? Did it suck eggs? Was it an excellent idea with bad execution? Was it a very good title that just flew under the radar? Was it unfairly tarred by the perception that it was supposed to be "Sandman done right"?
>
> Any and all opinions are welcome and encouraged.

Judging by the posts below, it would seem that I'm in the minority here -- but I really enjoyed Sleepwalker. It was actually the first and last comic book series I got a mail-in subscription to and I still have the complete series (along with the Holiday Special and Sleepwalker's later appearances by Kirkman in Epic #1 and Marvel Team-Up)

Aside from a very original concept, the book had a lot of characters I could sympathize with -- I thought Rick made a very interesting foil for Sleepwalker and gave an interesting twist to the traditional "secret identity" gimmick. Sleepwalker also had the tragic hero bit going for him (a lost ET trying to help people despite the fact that they were terrified of him -- kind of surprised nobody mentioned the word "mutant" to him though). Even Rick's dog Rambo made a good impression on me -- I loved the way he woke Rick up every morning.

To me the book started going downhill when they did the whole "invasion of the Sleepwalkers" storyline. Although the stories Budiansky told had a unique SF-fantasy feel to them, I think the book would have been better served if they focused more on the book's characters and their day-to-day problems. One of the more intriguing storylines had Sleepwalker develop an addiction to a certain type of light -- I would have liked to have seen his recovery explored in more detail. Rick and Alyssa's relationship could have been delved into more deeply (despite being attractive, Alyssa never really received a lot of character development). Budiansky also set Rick up with an interesting work/personal life -- Rick was on the basketball team, a tutor, a handyman, and an up-and-coming filmmaker. Any of these aspects of his life (and the complications and advantages Sleepwalker could have brought to them) could have been explored -- but never were.

Honestly, I think the character of Sleepwalker and his supporting cast has a lot of potential -- and could still make an excellent comic book for today. Considering that even Squirrel Girl is starting to get some respect and a growing fan base, I wouldn't discount the possibility of another Sleepwalker book.




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Jared




> >

>
> Judging by the posts below, it would seem that I'm in the minority here -- but I really enjoyed Sleepwalker. It was actually the first and last comic book series I got a mail-in subscription to and I still have the complete series (along with the Holiday Special and Sleepwalker's later appearances by Kirkman in Epic #1 and Marvel Team-Up)

I'm only missing issues #18, and #30-32. Aaarggh!

> Aside from a very original concept, the book had a lot of characters I could sympathize with -- I thought Rick made a very interesting foil for Sleepwalker and gave an interesting twist to the traditional "secret identity" gimmick. Sleepwalker also had the tragic hero bit going for him (a lost ET trying to help people despite the fact that they were terrified of him -- kind of surprised nobody mentioned the word "mutant" to him though). Even Rick's dog Rambo made a good impression on me -- I loved the way he woke Rick up every morning.

Hear, hear!

> To me the book started going downhill when they did the whole "invasion of the Sleepwalkers" storyline. Although the stories Budiansky told had a unique SF-fantasy feel to them, I think the book would have been better served if they focused more on the book's characters and their day-to-day problems. One of the more intriguing storylines had Sleepwalker develop an addiction to a certain type of light -- I would have liked to have seen his recovery explored in more detail. Rick and Alyssa's relationship could have been delved into more deeply (despite being attractive, Alyssa never really received a lot of character development). Budiansky also set Rick up with an interesting work/personal life -- Rick was on the basketball team, a tutor, a handyman, and an up-and-coming filmmaker. Any of these aspects of his life (and the complications and advantages Sleepwalker could have brought to them) could have been explored -- but never were.

Well, Budiansky did touch on them briefly here and there, but you're right. I personally think the six-part arc where Sleepwalker and Rick swapped bodies went on too long (although it did give the Macendale Hobgoblin one of his very few wins, even if he had 8-Ball there to help him out), although at least at the start it gave some great development to 8-Ball.

On the other hand, the major, overarcing plot of the book, the one most readers seem to have ignored, came up around that time.

> Honestly, I think the character of Sleepwalker and his supporting cast has a lot of potential -- and could still make an excellent comic book for today. Considering that even Squirrel Girl is starting to get some respect and a growing fan base, I wouldn't discount the possibility of another Sleepwalker book.

Well, that's sort of what I'm doing-writing an Ultimate Sleepwalker, at least. I've changed some of the details (most notably on some of the villains considered "lame", such as turning the Chain Gang into a delusional, messed-up war veteran with split personality disorder, rather than the Four Stooges), but some of the other basic themes are the same.

And I've seen a surprising number of posts here and there on various forums and blogs from other closet Sleepwalker fans, who either clamour for an Ultimate or MAX Sleepwalker release, or otherwise enjoyed the series.

I'd personally love to see what someone like Alan Moore, J.M. DeMatteis or Frank Miller could do with Sleepwalker-I personally disagree with Robert Kirkman that making Sleepy into a "brooding vigilante" ruins some of Budiansky's original concept. As a matter of fact, there were some pretty dark moments in Budiansky's original series as well-just look at the issues featuring Psyko, for example, and tell me that it was campy, light-hearted fun.

Besides which, in his Marvel Team-Up series, Kirkman messed up one of the most basic aspects of Sleepwalker's physiology-his race doesn't sleep! It kept him from being charmed by Lullaby, and was the whole reason Nightmare invaded Rick Sheridan's mind, plotting to drive Sleepwalker mad and then give Nightmare access to the Sleepwalker race's minds, which he'd never been able to do given that they didn't sleep.


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Michael Jung




It's a spoof about two comic writers pitching new Sleepwalker titles to Quesada -- it lampoons Sleepy heavily (along with most of Marvel's comic lines) but I've got a feeling these guys are fans too \:\)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JXLDvp0prUk


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zeus




I wasn't real big on the art, and sometimes the dialogue left me a little underwhelmed. That being said, I do have quite a few of the issues, due largely to the use of imaginative new villains. THEY were fun.



>
> In case it's not obvious by now, I'm a big fan of Budiansky's original series. I've already stated my opinion on the subject, so I won't repeat it here, unless someone asks me to.
>
> But I was wondering what the opinions of other posters were. Did it get what it deserved? Did it suck eggs? Was it an excellent idea with bad execution? Was it a very good title that just flew under the radar? Was it unfairly tarred by the perception that it was supposed to be "Sandman done right"?
>
> Any and all opinions are welcome and encouraged.


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Jared




> It's a spoof about two comic writers pitching new Sleepwalker titles to Quesada -- it lampoons Sleepy heavily (along with most of Marvel's comic lines) but I've got a feeling these guys are fans too \:\)
>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JXLDvp0prUk

At first I was somewhat offended, thinking that this was just another in the long line of "humorous" insults directed at Sleepy over the years, but upon seeing the comments of yourself and others, I've begun to get the humor behind it. I'm just not the kind of person who'd be inclined to satirize the things I myself love.

It's funny how more and more people seem to be clamoring for a new Sleepwalker series, whether it be in the MAX or Ultimate lines, as I've seen on a number of forums-that's exactly what I'm doing in my own fanfiction series-writing an Ultimate-style re-imagining of the Sleepwalker mythos, set it its own distinct version of the Marvel Universe.

I've incorporated, or am about to incorporate, all of Bob Budiansky's old villains, some of them in very different forms from their original versions, and I've even revived some of the really obscure Scourge victims for good measure.

Anyone ever heard of Hellrazor?

How about Megatak?

How many people heard of the Ringer before I mentioned him on this forum?

They're all here, and they've all been re-imagined.

Omar Karindu, if you're reading this, I have you to thank for this idea. Your criticisms of Hellrazor and Megatak on the Appendix to the Handbook of the Marvel Universe provided a challenge I couldn't resist-take these lameasses and make them into badasses.


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Michael Jung




> > It's a spoof about two comic writers pitching new Sleepwalker titles to Quesada -- it lampoons Sleepy heavily (along with most of Marvel's comic lines) but I've got a feeling these guys are fans too \:\)
> >
> > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JXLDvp0prUk
>
> At first I was somewhat offended, thinking that this was just another in the long line of "humorous" insults directed at Sleepy over the years, but upon seeing the comments of yourself and others, I've begun to get the humor behind it. I'm just not the kind of person who'd be inclined to satirize the things I myself love.

Heh -- yeah, I'll admit the video can be seen as offensive, but the satire aside, I have to admit I was impressed by the amount of time these guys put into creating a video about an obscure Marvel character (and I did think the animation at the end was actually pretty cool)

Personally I don't have a problem when people lampoon my favorite characters (although there are a few instances when I think they go a bit too far).

Speaking of which, did you know that there's a Marvel Comics "What The --?!"issue (I can't remember the number) that includes a parody of Sleepwalker? I don't know if it was written by Budiansky, but it was about Sleepwalker moving permanently out of Rick's mind (yeah I know that's technically impossible) and moving into the minds of various other Marvel characters in hopes of finding a better place to live.
>
> It's funny how more and more people seem to be clamoring for a new Sleepwalker series, whether it be in the MAX or Ultimate lines, as I've seen on a number of forums-that's exactly what I'm doing in my own fanfiction series-writing an Ultimate-style re-imagining of the Sleepwalker mythos, set it its own distinct version of the Marvel Universe.
>
> I've incorporated, or am about to incorporate, all of Bob Budiansky's old villains, some of them in very different forms from their original versions, and I've even revived some of the really obscure Scourge victims for good measure.
>
> Anyone ever heard of Hellrazor?
>
> How about Megatak?
>
> How many people heard of the Ringer before I mentioned him on this forum?
>
> They're all here, and they've all been re-imagined.
>
> Omar Karindu, if you're reading this, I have you to thank for this idea. Your criticisms of Hellrazor and Megatak on the Appendix to the Handbook of the Marvel Universe provided a challenge I couldn't resist-take these lameasses and make them into badasses.


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Jared





> Heh -- yeah, I'll admit the video can be seen as offensive, but the satire aside, I have to admit I was impressed by the amount of time these guys put into creating a video about an obscure Marvel character (and I did think the animation at the end was actually pretty cool)
>
> Personally I don't have a problem when people lampoon my favorite characters (although there are a few instances when I think they go a bit too far).

Yeah, you have to admire the sheer amount of work they did, especially getting that girl to play the role of Alyssa Conover, more or less.

When you consider how crappy a lot of YouTube videos are, it's actually pretty well done.


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