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Author
Jamo


Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 2,061


I mean, we know months in advance about storylines and the next "big event" thanks to these coming out in Previews or online sites.
And then fandom does one of three things: bitch, cheer or yawn.
Did knowing months in advance about such big crossovers like "The Other" hurt or help Marvel in sales?
Would fans have bought them anyway without knowing about it in the first place?
I'm just thinking about how I went about it 20 years ago -- hell, even 10. There was no Internet in the `80's and I never had access to whatever previews other than Marvel Age, and that was just a 32-page version of the checklist.
10 years ago, I didn't own a computer, and only a couple of my friends had one to play Everquest or Starcraft.  I spent more time at strip bars and playing Twisted Metal 3 than waiting to find out the next big storyline for the fall/winter months.
I remember walking into the comic shop, picking my favorite books and enjoying the storylines so much that it didn't matter if they were involved with an 18-part crossover. (Sigh...X-Cutioner's Song, anyone?)
Now, I can pick up a preview and go, "Oh look, something I don't have to buy anymore."

Thoughts?




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mjyoung





    Quote:
    Thoughts?


I rememeber when  I was younger thinking that the Age of Apocalypse was permanent. \:\(

Knowing information months in advance helps a title in terms of sales. It won't turn many people off of an idea, but it will create interest in other readers.

Hiding the information from fans wouldn't work out. The demand would be huge, and you would just get rumor sites.

It also hurts with promotion, a publisher wouldn't be able to promote a future title. Now if we see something like the teaser image for the Return, we can generate lots of discussion about the idea.

I can certainly understand where you are coming from, but it's an antiquated, impractical, and bad idea.



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The Black Guardian

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Location: Paragon City, RI
Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008



    Quote:

      Quote:
      Thoughts?

    I rememeber when  I was younger thinking that the Age of Apocalypse was permanent. \:\(

Started in 1980, and it wasn't long after this that Marvel started printing Marvel Age (1982), which my LCS gave away free to their subscriptioners. DC had their equivalent, but I forgot what it was called.

Then in the early-90s there was Advance Comics, plus the CSN. Later came Previews.

And then there was CBG, which had all the necessary interviews and stuff.




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mjyoung





    Quote:

      Quote:

        Quote:
        Thoughts?

      I rememeber when I was younger thinking that the Age of Apocalypse was permanent. \:\(

    Started in 1980, and it wasn't long after this that Marvel started printing Marvel Age (1982), which my LCS gave away free to their subscriptioners. DC had their equivalent, but I forgot what it was called.



    Quote:
    Then in the early-90s there was Advance Comics, plus the CSN. Later came Previews.



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    And then there was CBG, which had all the necessary interviews and stuff.


I would guess that solicitations became the norm when the direct market was created in the late 70s. The direct market where comics weren't returnable, ordering had to be more accurate, and the success of the store/business would depend entirely on the information a store owner was given. But for newstands/7-11s, comics were returnable, and comics only made up a small part of their business.

I'm curious about how solicitations have changed over the years. Have they always consisted of creative teams, story summary, and cover? Has the time between sale date and the issuing of solicitations been changed? I'm guessing it hasn't always been a 3 month gap.

The internet has changed this release of information dramatically. I started reading comics in the mid 90s, and I don't think I started seeing the previews online until 2000 or so. I'm guessing a high number (say 90%) of comic readers see the information online today.

My point was that preventing the customers from gaining the knowledge about future comics is a bad thing, with no real positive effect. The reader should be given a choice, which is what he has now.



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The Black Guardian

Moderator

Location: Paragon City, RI
Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008



    Quote:

      Quote:

        Quote:

          Quote:
          Thoughts?

        I rememeber when I was younger thinking that the Age of Apocalypse was permanent. \:\(

      Started in 1980, and it wasn't long after this that Marvel started printing Marvel Age (1982), which my LCS gave away free to their subscriptioners. DC had their equivalent, but I forgot what it was called.

      Then in the early-90s there was Advance Comics, plus the CSN. Later came Previews.

      And then there was CBG, which had all the necessary interviews and stuff.

    I would guess that solicitations became the norm when the direct market was created in the late 70s. The direct market where comics weren't returnable, ordering had to be more accurate, and the success of the store/business would depend entirely on the information a store owner was given. But for newstands/7-11s, comics were returnable, and comics only made up a small part of their business.

    I'm curious about how solicitations have changed over the years. Have they always consisted of creative teams, story summary, and cover? Has the time between sale date and the issuing of solicitations been changed? I'm guessing it hasn't always been a 3 month gap.

I haven't really taken an interest in what was available before 1982. I do recall in-house "info-tisements" from Marvel in typical solicit form (in the small Stan's Soapbox or Bullpen Bulletins notices). They were never complete, line-wide solicits. Of course, back then, Marvel didn't release that many books to begin with.

The Marvel Age solicits had a summary, and a choice selection of covers (maybe 6-8). These were two months ahead, iirc. At the time, DC tended to push the names of creative teams more than Marvel, but I think Marvel started giving the names in some solicits.

Advance Comics was Capital City Distributors' version of the catalog/zine and almost a carbon copy of what we get today in Previews (pretty sure Diamond got this idea from Capital City). This zine started at the very end of 1988/early 1989.


    Quote:
    The internet has changed this release of information dramatically. I started reading comics in the mid 90s, and I don't think I started seeing the previews online until 2000 or so. I'm guessing a high number (say 90%) of comic readers see the information online today.

Indeed.


    Quote:
    My point was that preventing the customers from gaining the knowledge about future comics is a bad thing, with no real positive effect. The reader should be given a choice, which is what he has now.

No doubt about that.




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Jamo


Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 2,061



    Quote:
    The Marvel Age solicits had a summary, and a choice selection of covers (maybe 6-8). These were two months ahead, iirc. At the time, DC tended to push the names of creative teams more than Marvel, but I think Marvel started giving the names in some solicits.


I've managed to keep the ones I bought back then and have found a few in give-away or free-bee bins.




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