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The Avenger


Location: New Jersey
Member Since: Thu Dec 02, 2021


I personally like Captain Marvel as her code name, but I guess that ship has sailed.

I never liked Photon or Spectrum, although of the two, I like Spectrum better.

I'm coming around to the opinion that because her civilian name just sounds really cool, she should simply be known by her civilian name.



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The Black Guardian

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Location: Paragon City, RI
Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008


Never liked her using Captain Marvel. It always felt like a placeholder situation to me.

Once you've had 3 codenames, it's time to give it up. I've liked both Photon and Spectrum. Especially since the general public is only just now getting to know her, I'd say don't change things.

But I don't like civilian names.




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Iron Man Unit 007

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Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 5,929


Yeah she did feel like a place holder at times to keep the trademark safe after they wrote themselves into a corner when they killed Mar-Vell.

I was fine with Genis taking over, but editorial sabotage/mandate ended that.

Carol taking the name is fine.

Unless her current story is finally reviving Mar-Vell but I doubt that.


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The Avenger


Location: New Jersey
Member Since: Thu Dec 02, 2021



    Quote:
    Never liked her using Captain Marvel. It always felt like a placeholder situation to me.


Unfortunately, I think you were right. In Marvel's eyes, it was a placeholder.


    Quote:
    Once you've had 3 codenames, it's time to give it up. I've liked both Photon and Spectrum. Especially since the general public is only just now getting to know her, I'd say don't change things.


Does Monica get a code name in the Scarlet Witch/Vision series? I can't bring myself to watch that show. I hate sitcoms.


    Quote:
    But I don't like civilian names.


How about - Monica Marvel?

(Just kidding.)




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The Black Guardian

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Location: Paragon City, RI
Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008


One possible origin of the Rambeau surname is that it comes from the Germanic Hram (crow) + Berht (bright).

Bright crow?! PHOENIX!

But it's more likely just French ragin (brave) + bald (counsel).

Rambo seems related to the Germanic, but through Scandinavian roots.




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Menshevik


Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 5,073



    Quote:
    Never liked her using Captain Marvel. It always felt like a placeholder situation to me.



    Quote:
    Once you've had 3 codenames, it's time to give it up. I've liked both Photon and Spectrum. Especially since the general public is only just now getting to know her, I'd say don't change things.



    Quote:
    But I don't like civilian names.


I largely agree. I'm not entirely happy with the situation, but the problem does seem to be that Monica Rambeau has not been shown too attached to her code-names. In-story she was given the name "Captain Marvel" by the news media in New Orleans, and she didn't give Genis-Vell too much trouble when he wanted to assume his father's name (and later rename himself Photon). I did not like Spectrum that much because it ran counter to the pattern of her established costumes, which were all black and white.



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Iron Man Unit 007

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Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 5,929


Seriously, if there can be a Captain Marvel why not Major Marvel


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Menshevik


Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 5,073



    Quote:
    Seriously, if there can be a Captain Marvel why not Major Marvel


The problem with that idea is that unlike "Captain", the word "Major" indicates a specific rank in a military-style hierarchy. "Captain" OTOH is not only ambiguous as a rank (a navy captain is the equivalent of an army colonel), it is also used formally or informally for people with a much smaller authority, e. g. the captain of a yacht or the captain of a football team. Call a superhero Major Something, and there's bound to be questions who appointed them, or whether they hold the rank of major in their non-costumed role. Monica Rambeau was a lieutenant in the New Orleans Harbor Patrol, so some might feel that she would be presumptuous to assume the rank of major (others might consider her nautical background reason to call her Commodore Marvel or Admiral Marvel ;\-\) )

It would also once again invite comparisons with Carol Danvers, who was an actual major in the USAF before she became a superheroine.

Incidentally, I am a bit dubious about including the "Marvel" bit anyway. In the Marvel Universe, "Marvel" these days tends to indicate a connection to Mar-Vell and the Kree (in the case of Mar-Vell himself and his two kids, as well as Carol's aliases Ms. Marvel and Captain Marvel, and the current Marvel Boy, Noh-Varr) or to Carol Danvers (Kamala Khan named herself after the original Ms. Marvel and dresses herself in a variation of one of her costumes). Other "Marvel" names (Marvel Girl, Speedball the Masked Marvel) seem to have fallen into disuse.



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The Avenger


Location: New Jersey
Member Since: Thu Dec 02, 2021



    Quote:
    The problem with that idea is that unlike "Captain", the word "Major" indicates a specific rank in a military-style hierarchy. "Captain" OTOH is not only ambiguous as a rank (a navy captain is the equivalent of an army colonel), it is also used formally or informally for people with a much smaller authority, e. g. the captain of a yacht or the captain of a football team. Call a superhero Major Something, and there's bound to be questions who appointed them, or whether they hold the rank of major in their non-costumed role.


One way "Major" avoids the pitfall of genuine military ranking is when it's paired with a noun in such a way as to imply one of its other meanings. For example, DC has a character named, "Major Disaster."


    Quote:
    Monica Rambeau was a lieutenant in the New Orleans Harbor Patrol, so some might feel that she would be presumptuous to assume the rank of major (others might consider her nautical background reason to call her Commodore Marvel or Admiral Marvel ;\-\) )


Monica's rank as a lieutenant could be paired with her surname: "Lieutenant Rambeau." Unfortunately, the WandaVision TV series establishes her rank in the USAF as captain (according to Wikipedia). "Captain Rambeau" is workable, of course, but it sounds a little strange when paired with "Captain Marvel."


    Quote:
    Incidentally, I am a bit dubious about including the "Marvel" bit anyway. In the Marvel Universe, "Marvel" these days tends to indicate a connection to Mar-Vell and the Kree (in the case of Mar-Vell himself and his two kids, as well as Carol's aliases Ms. Marvel and Captain Marvel, and the current Marvel Boy, Noh-Varr) or to Carol Danvers (Kamala Khan named herself after the original Ms. Marvel and dresses herself in a variation of one of her costumes). Other "Marvel" names (Marvel Girl, Speedball the Masked Marvel) seem to have fallen into disuse.


Well, in the MCU, Monica is a supporting character of Carol Danvers. This is of course not the case in the comic books.



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Superman's Pal

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Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 5,730


But you wouldn't want to call her Lieutenant Marvel because that would be confusing with the Fawcett/DC characters as well.

Even if they're not used any more.



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Menshevik


Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 5,073



    Quote:

      Quote:
      The problem with that idea is that unlike "Captain", the word "Major" indicates a specific rank in a military-style hierarchy. "Captain" OTOH is not only ambiguous as a rank (a navy captain is the equivalent of an army colonel), it is also used formally or informally for people with a much smaller authority, e. g. the captain of a yacht or the captain of a football team. Call a superhero Major Something, and there's bound to be questions who appointed them, or whether they hold the rank of major in their non-costumed role.



    Quote:
    One way "Major" avoids the pitfall of genuine military ranking is when it's paired with a noun in such a way as to imply one of its other meanings. For example, DC has a character named, "Major Disaster."


I'd say it does not entirely avoid that pitfall. People will still think of the military rank (I know I did with Major Disaster). A lot depends on context. For instance, in the fourth season of Blackadder, five of the six episodes had titles consisting of a military rank and another word: Captain Cook(1), Corporal Punishment(2), Major Star(3), Private Plane, and General Hospital. Normally I never think of the military rank when I read the words "General Hospital", but here I had to.

(1) As in Captain James Cook (1728-1779). (The episode focused on food in the British army on the Western Front in World War 1).
(2) Also the name of one of Krusty the Clown's supporting players on The Simpsons.
(3) Could be a real-life name, although in English the spelling "Starr" is more common, AFAIK.


    Quote:

      Quote:
      Monica Rambeau was a lieutenant in the New Orleans Harbor Patrol, so some might feel that she would be presumptuous to assume the rank of major (others might consider her nautical background reason to call her Commodore Marvel or Admiral Marvel ;\-\) )



    Quote:
    Monica's rank as a lieutenant could be paired with her surname: "Lieutenant Rambeau." Unfortunately, the WandaVision TV series establishes her rank in the USAF as captain (according to Wikipedia). "Captain Rambeau" is workable, of course, but it sounds a little strange when paired with "Captain Marvel."


Well, IIRC, the Avengers did manage to operate with both a Captain America and a Captain Marvel on the team in the past.


    Quote:

      Quote:
      Incidentally, I am a bit dubious about including the "Marvel" bit anyway. In the Marvel Universe, "Marvel" these days tends to indicate a connection to Mar-Vell and the Kree (in the case of Mar-Vell himself and his two kids, as well as Carol's aliases Ms. Marvel and Captain Marvel, and the current Marvel Boy, Noh-Varr) or to Carol Danvers (Kamala Khan named herself after the original Ms. Marvel and dresses herself in a variation of one of her costumes). Other "Marvel" names (Marvel Girl, Speedball the Masked Marvel) seem to have fallen into disuse.



    Quote:
    Well, in the MCU, Monica is a supporting character of Carol Danvers. This is of course not the case in the comic books.


Exactly, and it seems many of Monica's fans want to stress her independence.





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