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Post By
Progressive Lantern

In Reply To
yelmurc99

Subj: Re: About "Batman: The Long Halloween" . . .
Posted: Tue Feb 20, 2007 at 09:34:28 pm EST
Reply Subj: Re: About "Batman: The Long Halloween" . . .
Posted: Sat Feb 17, 2007 at 08:00:33 pm EST (Viewed 1 times)

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the biggest difference between LONG HALLOWEEN and Loeb's Superman/Batman stuff (which i also dig) is MOOD. even though Loeb might have known what kind of story arcs he wanted to tell in S/B... LONG HALLOWEEN is a finite story. and that gives him a chance to set the tone and mood for every scene.

the other big difference is Mr. Tim Sale. when he and Jeph Loeb are together, it's pretty much nothing short of magic (see Daredevil: Yellow, Spider-Man: Blue, and Hulk: Grey).


> ...allright, a few threads down, there's a thread in which Year One is being discussed, and a comparision with Long Halloween arised, some posters even mentioning that it was even better than Year One.
> I've read Year One and enjoyed it a big deal, but I've never tried Long Halloween at all. All I know about it, it's that it was written by Jeph Loeb, a writer of whom I have only read some Superman/Batman issues, and was very disappointed by the extremely poor scripts. Because of that, I've never dared touch anything else written by Loeb.
> So, my question is: is there any possibility at all, that someone who has found Loeb's Superman/Batman stories may ever enjoy The Long Halloween at all? I found his Superman/Batman stuff way too simplistic, two-dimensional and unimaginative.
> Thanks in advance for your replies, and please, if there are any Jeph Loeb fans around here, don't feel offended by my comments. It's not my intention to offend.
> Cheers.
>
>
>
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> "Alright you primitive screw-heads, listen up. See this? This is my boomstick! It's a 12-gauge double-barreled Remington. S-Mart's top of the line. You can find this in the sporting goods department. That's right, this sweet baby was made in Grand Rapids, Michigan; retails for about one hundred nine, ninety-five. It's got a walnut stock, cobalt blue steel, and a hair trigger. That's right, shop smart, shop S-Mart!"
> (by Ash Williams, from Army of Darkness).

> the biggest difference between LONG HALLOWEEN and Loeb's Superman/Batman stuff (which i also dig) is MOOD.


I don't mind so much the mood, as long as the story is well-plotted, and the final resolution makes sense according to what was previously set up. I can enjoy moody stories as well as silver-agey stuff, as long as it's good.
But Loeb's Silver Agey stuff, just didn't cut it for me. But hey, maybe he's better at other type of stories.



> even though Loeb might have known what kind of story arcs he wanted to tell in S/B... LONG HALLOWEEN is a finite story. and that gives him a chance to set the tone and mood for every scene.
>
> the other big difference is Mr. Tim Sale.


Tim Sale always marks a difference. The guy is THAT good.



> when he and Jeph Loeb are together, it's pretty much nothing short of magic (see Daredevil: Yellow, Spider-Man: Blue, and Hulk: Grey).



Not much of a Marvel fan, sorry.
I used to be a big Avengers fan, till Avengers Disassembled, which I hated. I gave Marvel a second try with Captain America & the Falcon and The New Invaders and both got cancelled early.
First, they destroyed the Avengers (Avengers Disassembled); then the X-Men (House of M, and that "No more mutants" line), and now they destroyed everything else (in Civil War... the New Warriors killed, the Fantastic 4 split-up, Spiderman's identity made public... a mess, really).
Anyway, thanks a lot for your reply. It's been very helpful.





"Alright you primitive screw-heads, listen up. See this? This is my boomstick! It's a 12-gauge double-barreled Remington. S-Mart's top of the line. You can find this in the sporting goods department. That's right, this sweet baby was made in Grand Rapids, Michigan; retails for about one hundred nine, ninety-five. It's got a walnut stock, cobalt blue steel, and a hair trigger. That's right, shop smart, shop S-Mart!"
(by Ash Williams, from Army of Darkness).