Captain America >> View Post
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Post By
Einheri

In Reply To
Hank Pym

Subj: Re: Cap is no longer relevant.........
Posted: Fri Mar 09, 2007 at 10:11:22 am CST
Reply Subj: Cap is no longer relevant.........
Posted: Fri Mar 09, 2007 at 09:28:29 am CST

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Not because of his beliefs and ideals, but because our society is caught up in the "what do I personally get out of this" way of thinking. I have a 10 month old baby and a friend of mine said to me, "Why did you want a baby, there really is no return on having a child. You spend, spend, spend for what?" geez, I don't know, maybe the way she smiles at me when I make a goofy face, or the way she pays attention when I read her a book, or will hold my finger when she is resting in my arms before she goes to sleep. Will she someday support me and help me pay my bills? I hope not. I hope I don't need that from her. I would rather raise her to be a good person who will do the right thing, care about others and know right from wrong. If she has a happy life than that is my reward. Can I put a dollar amount on that? Nope. Priceless. Should more people have that attitude? I am definetly not one to talk, but to me I always thought Cap felt that way about life and the American ideal. Just me rambling.



> Many are saying that Cap's death is because he is no longer relevant. I hope this storyline proves this wrong. In fact, seeing how many people are saying - as they've saying for awhile now - that Cap is out of step with the times, I think that Cap's death is a good thing.
>
> As Cap's co-creator said, we need Cap more than ever.
>
> The assumption that Cap is out of step with the times is rooted in two very ignorant assumptions. The first is that the 1930s-1940s was more "black-and-white" as opposed to the our times, which is replete with shades of grey. While there is a little truth to this, it is only a little. Moreover, those who actually fought in WWII, they were only too familiar with moral ambiguities and difficulties in a way that civilians were not. Also, the greatest generation was not so far from the roaring 20s that they were unfamiliar with "shades of grey."
>
> The second faulty assumption is that our culture is all shades of grey. Again, there is some truth to this. But even yesterday I was reading the story of a courageous soldier who sacrificed his life saving others by fighting dozens of al qaeda terrorists flowing out of basements. His body was found booby-trapped, beaten, and shot execution style. Or, for another example, the soldiers interviewed on NBC Nightly News this week, who sign up for multiple tours of duty - which they don't have to - because the Iraqi people want them to stay and help stabilize their area. Or even at home, the thousands of people who police or streets, go into burning buildings, run charities, or even just coach little leauge.
>
> Or how about the economic backbone of our country, small business entrepreneurs find a world of risk (and tax and regulation), employ others, pay themselves last, and if they are successful, a surprising number of hands reaching into their pockets; yet they take on the risk, and usually have a number of failed businesses and years of slavish work with little reward before success - if any.
>
> Of course, these folks do not often make the talking-head shows, or seek popularity on "My Space" and "You tube." But their numbers are legion, and we depend on them every day. And the good they do is black-and-white, if not glamorous.
>
> The heroic spirit of courage and sacrifice the Captain America symbolizes is not out of step with our times. If it takes his death to make the point, then so be it.
>
> Ol' Skinflint

> Not because of his beliefs and ideals, but because our society is caught up in the "what do I personally get out of this" way of thinking. I have a 10 month old baby and a friend of mine said to me, "Why did you want a baby, there really is no return on having a child. You spend, spend, spend for what?" geez, I don't know, maybe the way she smiles at me when I make a goofy face, or the way she pays attention when I read her a book, or will hold my finger when she is resting in my arms before she goes to sleep. Will she someday support me and help me pay my bills? I hope not. I hope I don't need that from her. I would rather raise her to be a good person who will do the right thing, care about others and know right from wrong. If she has a happy life than that is my reward. Can I put a dollar amount on that? Nope. Priceless. Should more people have that attitude? I am definetly not one to talk, but to me I always thought Cap felt that way about life and the American ideal. Just me rambling.

Nice post. We need more of you out there talking, "Hank."
I certainly don't believe that everyone in America is part of the "me first crowd."
It just seems like it's the loudest ones who are.
Good luck with that li'l one.
Sounds like you're raising her right.


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