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Post By
Nitz the Bloody

In Reply To
jay

Subj: Re: Mark Millar and Steve McNiven CW Commentary in latest Wizard Magazine [SPOILERS]
Posted: Sun Sep 02, 2007 at 05:33:18 pm CDT
Reply Subj: Re: Mark Millar and Steve McNiven CW Commentary in latest Wizard Magazine [SPOILERS]
Posted: Sat Sep 01, 2007 at 12:50:58 am CDT

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> -- Lots of disbelief on Millar's part about how Iron Man is viewed as a bad guy. He discusses the Cap/IM meeting in issue 3, and makes a point that Cap throws the first punch (which is an untruth, because Tony took down two of Cap's men first). He seems to think that Iron Man's comprimising with the government is somehow a justifiable position. Given Millar's political statements in previous interviews, it seems odd that he'd take Tony's side.

It should be noted here, though, that Tony was mostly demonized in the Civil War-related crossovers, not in the main book Millar wrote. I started a ruckus here some time ago when I pointed out that Tony's position in the overall story was entirely defensible from the standpoint of realpolitik. Some of his methods, and the astonishing hubris on display (meant to reflect that of the neo-cons in the Bush administration) were the things to which people really objected.


> It should be noted here, though, that Tony was mostly demonized in the Civil War-related crossovers, not in the main book Millar wrote. I started a ruckus here some time ago when I pointed out that Tony's position in the overall story was entirely defensible from the standpoint of realpolitik. Some of his methods, and the astonishing hubris on display (meant to reflect that of the neo-cons in the Bush administration) were the things to which people really objected.

For one thing, Millar's Tony still had an active hand in the creation of the big three travesties of the pro-reg side-- Clor, the N-Zone prison, and the Thunderbolts. Millar didn't have to write Tony as a saint, but he shouldn't have written him as a dictator, either.

For another, the moment you add realpolitik to the superhero genre is the moment the genre comes crashing down like a Jenga tower. It's acceptable you're doing an explicit deconstruction of the concept, but realpolitik by definition removes all the noble ideology from a decision, and lapses into " ends justify the means " territory. Which is completely and utterly contrary to what superheroes do-- it's why superheroes don't kill, don't inflict any more pain than absolutely necessary, and don't force themselves into the political process. They just fight the supernatural forces that normal people can't, and if you analyze it too carefully, it stops being workable long-term. ( And Marvel Universe comics are supposed to go on forever, so Millar has delivered to us a massive problem.. )