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Post By
Edda
"Wait a minuite, they didn';t have laptops when this was made" double take reaction

In Reply To
FirstChAoS

Subj: Re: Two subjects this time; early appearances of the internet in comics; second subject battle vans
Posted: Wed Aug 26, 2009 at 05:27:14 pm CDT (Viewed 213 times)
Reply Subj: Re: Two subjects this time; early appearances of the internet in comics; second subject battle vans
Posted: Tue Aug 25, 2009 at 10:29:51 pm CDT (Viewed 247 times)

Previous Post

I don't know aqbout the battle van, but when reading the squadron supreme trade i was suprised to see cap's "monitor modem" his computer in a breifcase, and it was used by a laptop. I did a double take when I saw that, sort of a "Wait a minuite, they didn';t have laptops when this was made" double take reaction.

Well, in a universe containing Iron Man, The Fantastic Four, the X-Men, etc. one should not find it that alarming. I suppose, thought, that finding more of an over the horizon idea such Cap's laptop might seem a bit more striking than the extremely advanced technology those three I mentioned use.

Of course, this happens often: long before cellphones Midnight (the Quality/DC character), Doc Savage, and Dick Tracy (starting in 1946 for Dick Tracy) had two way wrist radio watches. Doc Savage's adventures anticipated many items of technology that later decades produced more widely. Lester Dent read technical journals to get ideas on technology. (Walter Gibson also had the Shadow using an early form of television in a 1931 or 1933 novel.) Some of the gadgets described in the series became reality, including flying wing, answering machines, television, automatic transmission, night vision goggles, and hand-held automatic weapons. Mike Hammer also had answering machine in the 1995 film Kiss Me Deadly. Daredevil's biopolymer armor based on spider-silk from Daredevi I#322 (published in 1993) anticipated this article from business week. (Kind of interesting that, instead of Spider-Man or the Spider, Daredevil has the armor based on spider-silk, eh?)
http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/06_32/b3996068.htm

Many people find it surprising that other than Telzey Amberden few science fiction writers seem to have anticipated the web. Of
course, 1986 stood only ten years from 1996, so just a bit of reading in technical journals would have turned up some ideas. A simi

http://www.marvunapp.com/Appendix3/riddleyhiram.htm

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/Defictionalization
The best topper might be Murray Leinster's prescient short story A Logic Named Joe. In it, he describes a networked computer system in homes across the country that allows people to learn how to cheat on taxes, find hangover cures, kill
their spouse using hard to trace household chemicals, and most of all allows young children to discover porn. He not only predicted the internet, but he predicted internet porn and the sinister uses people have for Google. In March of 1946.



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