Marvel Universe >> View Post
Post By
katefan

In Reply To
jwmccay3

Subj: Re: Help-us-out-a-little-here-dash-man.
Posted: Fri May 21, 2010 at 10:52:35 pm EDT (Viewed 95 times)
Reply Subj: Help-us-out-a-little-here-dash-man.
Posted: Sun May 16, 2010 at 10:08:53 am EDT (Viewed 142 times)

Previous Post

First off, talk like a big person. No one can understand what you are saying with the way you are typing. You make yourself sound like a fool right off the bat.

Secondly, if you have a valid point or an argument, explain it and actually defend your point. That is what these boards are about. Those on the boards may not always see eye-to-eye with each other on these boards, but that's one of the reasons these boards were created...having an opportunity to argue and critique characters intellectually. Most of the people on the boards will discuss this with you if you actually have anything there.

Finally...yeah, there might be some common threads there, but both major companies (and ALL of the minor companies) have influenced the other on the development of their characters and titles. It is a form of flattery. Look up and down the rosters of characters and you see that everywhere. It all depends on which company you are more loyal to. Myself, I have never liked DC because, outside of a very few villains, their villains have no depth like the main Marvel villains. Ditto for the superheroes.

For me, it is very difficult to relate to many of the heroes in DC, whereas in Marvel the heroes have more of a down-to-earth background that many people can relate to...even those that are rich, gifted, or supernaturally-powered. Look at the origins of The Punisher (grunt soldier whose family is killed); Spidey, Nova, Darkhawk (dorky or unpopular teenagers given extraordinary powers); Captain America (95-lb weakling who becomes what everyone wants to be); Iron Man (yeah he's rich, but his demons are many and everyone can relate to that); Daredevil (grew up a blind teenager in Hell's Kitchen--one of the worst places in America to live when his character was created); Hawkeye (orphan who can only rely on his brother growing up and gets himself into trouble with the law); any of the original, second, or third wave of X-Men (gifted or different people who are persecuted for who they are or what they do)...I don't think that I really need to go on. Readers can relate to those characters better than the origins of the main DC characters.

I respect your points and you are right, what made Marvel in the beginning superior to DC was the down-to-Earth origins of their characters. But I think over time the lines have blurred. Superman, for example, is more identifiable with some fans because he is happily married and well adjusted, while Peter Parker is once again a man-child loser unable to maintain a career after making a deal with Satan.

Tony Stark gets the last five years of his memory wiped in a massive do-over, while Hal Jordan still has to live down the fact that he was once the super villain Parallax.

Professor Xavier is a paraplegic...no, wait, he walks! No, wait, he's a paraplegic again. No, wait, he's walking! While Barbara Gordon is still consistently wheelchair bound.

And yeah, Marvel Divas is just an attempt from Marvel to try and make their own Birds of Prey comic. It might work...if they had the unstoppable Gail Simone writing it.

As for dorky and unpopular kids getting powers, what makes that unrealistic is that more of them don't go all Columbine with their new abilities and get revenge on all that assholes who tormented them.

Fact is, while Marvel started out with a more realistic bent, over time they have become every bit as unrealistic as DC, while DC has striven over the past few decades to attempt to emulate some of Marvel's mojo.