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Post By
Nose Norton

In Reply To
dave

Subj: Re: Really? [SPOILERS]
Posted: Wed May 02, 2007 at 09:14:36 am EDT
Reply Subj: Re: Really? [SPOILERS]
Posted: Mon Apr 30, 2007 at 12:52:12 pm EDT

Previous Post

> > In a way that no spider-man comic has since civil war started. Its nice to see gwen from way back when she had a personality (before her hair became all strait and her uncle died)
> >
>
> Huh. From the preview, I felt like the writer shoehorned an artificial contemporary Lindsey Lohan esque personality for Gwen that there's no actual basis for. It actually sorta irked me. It would be like if Harry Osborn started talking Shakespearian for no reason (okay, obviously not that bad, but still I wasn't a fan...). You can give her a personality by taking cues from earlier books and expanding it the best you can... not creating something out of nothing. But I'm probably in the minority of not being very excited about this book based on the preview.
>

That's because they never really gave her a personality before. Seriously, she was the most generic character to ever exist and is looked back on by fanboyism as the greatest woman ever just because of nostalgia. If she hadn't died she would be just another ex of Pete's.

> > Between this and Iron Fist, Fraction looks to be one of the best new additions to the Marvel family.

> > > In a way that no spider-man comic has since civil war started. Its nice to see gwen from way back when she had a personality (before her hair became all strait and her uncle died)
> > >
> >
> > Huh. From the preview, I felt like the writer shoehorned an artificial contemporary Lindsey Lohan esque personality for Gwen that there's no actual basis for. It actually sorta irked me. It would be like if Harry Osborn started talking Shakespearian for no reason (okay, obviously not that bad, but still I wasn't a fan...). You can give her a personality by taking cues from earlier books and expanding it the best you can... not creating something out of nothing. But I'm probably in the minority of not being very excited about this book based on the preview.
> >
>
> That's because they never really gave her a personality before. Seriously, she was the most generic character to ever exist and is looked back on by fanboyism as the greatest woman ever just because of nostalgia. If she hadn't died she would be just another ex of Pete's.
>
Compared to Pepper Potts, Jane Foster, Karen Page, Sue Richards, Dorrie Evans, and Betty Ross, Gwen actually had a wealth of character. Betty, too. The reason I like Gwen is because Peter's relationship with her actually progressed closer to real life than any other relationship in Silver Age Marvel. In Daredevil, Thor, and Iron Man, grown men actually want to ask their respective "girlfriends" to marry them, even though they've never even had meaningful conversations with them (on panel, anyway), let alone been on dates.
In Spider-Man, you can follow the progression of two people falling in true love, with the insecurites, the highs and lows, the jealousies. Peter doesn't even admit to himself that he loves her until issue 61, I believe. That makes me nostalgic, more than Gwen's death.
I could see if you're not a fan of the Silver Age feeling that Gwen was a very generic character, compared to later characters or character who were allowed to grow, but really she was as much defined by her love interest, who was the main character of the story, as any other female from the time (MJ didn't have a real love interest until after Gwen died). If I had to rank Marvel's Silver Age romances, the top three would probably be Peter/Gwen, Peter/Betty, and Scott Summers/Jean Grey.