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Post By
Blue Beetle

In Reply To
Sandman

Subj: Re: Bring Back Supergirl
Posted: Sun Nov 11, 2007 at 06:14:53 pm EST
Reply Subj: Re: Bring Back Supergirl
Posted: Sun Nov 11, 2007 at 02:30:11 am EST

Previous Post

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> > Good-bye
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> Hello.
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> > As one of those absolutely loved the Byrne-era, it may surprise a few people that were actually a couple of things that I thought he threw the baby out with the bathwater. One of them was Kara Zor-El.
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> I disliked the Byrne era. It made no sense to me because Superman was powered down but the other heroes weren't, which left me thinking that Superman was no longer the most powerful hero, and that bugged me. If all the heroes had been powered down, I might have had a different reaction.

They were powered down, the other "overpowered" ones that is like Captain Marvel, in fact, the DC universe now had new rules in reality that effected everyone and Superman was still one of the most powerful beings on the planet. Although there were a lot of glitches, they wanted it to be more believable and plot driven for the readers which pre-crisis Superman was too powerful to let happen.

A god-like Superman works a lot better then a omnipotent one.
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> > And, over the years DC did try to bring in some kind of Supergirl like Matrix from the Pocket Universe, the often-overlooked Power Girl, and the Linda Danvers/Matrix hybrid, none of them truly matched up to Kara Zor-El. Until Jeph Loeb came up with his Girl From Krypton arc.
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> The incarnations you mention have their fans. I like Power Girl but I never liked the Matrix character, though I know many did.
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> > I am one of Loeb's biggest critics. I am not a fan of his story-telling, but I do think he has some of the best ideas in the comic biz.
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> I'm not a fan of Loeb at all.
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> > And his first issue of the Girl from Krypton had me at the edge of my seat. After that, it seemed as if he and others have dropped the ball on Kara.
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> I too was on the edge of my seat, but not because of Loeb. Any writer who was telling this particular story would have had me riveted. I only cared about one thing: Was this girl Kryptonian?
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> > In her first story arc, the readers totally lose out on any kind of insight to this character as her first several weeks/months(I forget which) is spent off-panel and on Paradise Island with a bunch of Amazons (one of my own personal fantasies as well). We spend months wondering if this was the real deal or a Darkseid plot.
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> Torturing us with a mystery of this sort is traditional comic book technique so I can't fault anyone in this instance.
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> > When do find out it is the real girl of steel, we are whisked to her own book where we discover she has an attitude and love of skimpy outfits that make ankle look skinny. We are treated with issue after issue of guest starring super heroes for her whale on. She encounters Luthor way too early with no sense of build up. And she seems pretty much on her own for an extremely tall 16-year old alien.
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> I didn't buy her solo comic for a long time. I recently have begun ordering it, concurrent with the beginning of the new writer's tenure, because the new writer used to be on Batgirl and that was a really good comic.
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> > Superman is so excited to have some family still alive that he pretty much ignores her except for some cameos here and there. We had more of a sense of brotherly love in those quaint 8-page stories of the silver age.
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> This is typical of DC in recent years. Supposedly Superman had a soft spot for Conner yet he rarely visited.
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> > It seems that nowadays comic creative staff believes that give women attitudes makes them modern and politically correct, but we already have a female kryptonian with attitude, it is the underused Power Girl. (and maybe Karsta Wor-Ul can be added to this as well).
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> The original Supergirl was classic. I would love to have her back. But at least the one we have is Kryptonian, is Superman's cousin, arrived on Earth as a teen-ager, is blonde, and wears the red, yellow, and blue. I'm thankful we have that much.
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> > Why can't we have the sweet Supergirl of the past? Why can't we have the Danvers? Why can't we have her attending school in Midvale? Why can't we have Dick Malverne?
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> I guess because none of that sold comic books in sufficient numbers.
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> Also, to a certain extent the "sweet Supergirl of the past" is unlikely to exist in a realistic storytelling milieu. Teen-agers have attitudes. This is normal. Imagine a teen-ager with invincible super powers and thus little to fear from any person short of Darkseid. Surely there would be discipline problems. At least the modern Supergirl is choosing to help the world with her powers. Many, many, many teen-agers, if given such awesome super powers, would use them for purely selfish ends.
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> > ...Whereas Superman grew up here and learned of the wonders of Krypton, we now Kara who would look at from the opposite direction.
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> Interesting contrast worth exploring, I agree.
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> > Hello!
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> Good-bye!
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> > I disliked the Byrne era. It made no sense to me because Superman was powered down but the other heroes weren't, which left me thinking that Superman was no longer the most powerful hero, and that bugged me. If all the heroes had been powered down, I might have had a different reaction.
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> They were powered down, the other "overpowered" ones that is like Captain Marvel, in fact, the DC universe now had new rules in reality that effected everyone and Superman was still one of the most powerful beings on the planet.


First, "one of" isn't good enough for me. Superman should be, hands down, the most powerful hero.

Secondly, Green Lantern wasn't powered down, nor was the Martian Manhunter, nor was the Flash, nor was Wonder Woman, nor Doctor Fate, nor the Spectre... who was powered down? Apparently Captain Marvel, from what you say. Who else?


> Although there were a lot of glitches, they wanted it to be more believable and plot driven for the readers which pre-crisis Superman was too powerful to let happen.


Marvel writers who were used to the Marvel Universe came to DC and suddenly Superman had to be powered down. It really wasn't necessary. Put Superman in the Marvel Universe and then yes, it would be necessary to power him down, as witness the ridiculous spectacle of the Sentry, a character too powerful for his universe so naturally he's agoraphobic and thus hides in his living room instead of getting involved. But DC was always different and didn't need to ape Marvel in order to be cool.

DC just needed to trim back the excess lunacy on the fringes of what Superman did in the Silver Age. Tossing a rock to the moon? Lunacy. Don't do that any more. But flying the rock to the moon is fine and doing it at near light speed is fine too.

Superman was generally more powerful than his enemies. In the Marvel Universe this would be unacceptable. But in the DC Universe it worked fine if the storytellers understood how to make it work. In a Superman story, we're generally not worried that Superman might get hurt. We're worried that someone else might get hurt. Thus we're worried about the very same thing that Superman is worried about. And while Superman has the power advantage, the villain has the "no scruples" advantage. The villain will put helpless innocents at risk. Superman won't ever do that, plus Superman will always be diverted from the battle to save any innocents who are endangered.

Superman has more power but also more scruples. The villain has less power but also less scruples. No Marvel story would every be structured like that. But DC is different.




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