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Post By
Would be Watcher

Location: Canada
Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
In Reply To
seeker

Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 7,976
Subj: as long as the power farthing doesn't destroy a chunk of their concept I don't care...
Posted: Mon Feb 14, 2011 at 10:25:26 pm EST (Viewed 120 times)
Reply Subj: How open are you about gods suddenly displaying unheard of powers? What limits should there be?
Posted: Mon Feb 14, 2011 at 09:19:07 pm EST (Viewed 253 times)

Previous Post

One question about comics is power creep, the spontaneous generation of new powers. These often come and go as the plot demands and if done wrongly or too far can in the eyes of many ruin a character and break down the internal logic of a story. If you list a character's powers that is more or less the limit of what they can do. The can be creative about application of that power, but that is about it. Professor X can read mind, project illusions in minds, and other standard telepathy abilities. Yet if he were to suddenly start flying that would be considered completely illogical within the context of the story. With gods we get the standard powers of immortality, superhuman physicalness, and usually something associated with their domain like weather control for Thor.

But how about gods? Some gods in myths rely heavily on enchanted objects, but other gods in myths can do pretty much whatever they want. The same with comics. This is mainly in the older stories, but even in modern stories gods are sometimes doing things just because they are gods. Balder one time walked unseen among humans. Thor used to almost have a new power each issue. In modern stories aside from the standard god package Hera has shown the ability to resurrect the dead and read minds. Apollo teleported Ares's son Alexander to him. In both instances neither abilities were really related to their godly roles, but were unquestionable accepted due to them being gods. Whenever a god does something that seems to come out of nowhere the standard answer is "there gods" and sort of transcend normal limitations of logic.

We have also seen this taken too far namely with Thor. The multitude of powers he demonstrated back in the Silver age is sometimes laughed at now. The ease with which he resurrected Odin and Loki. Reviving the dead is something that has always required great difficulty even for Odin. Many fans did not like the ease with which this happened and is probable going to happen in the future.

So, how accepting are people of gods demonstrating new powers as the plot demands? What limits should there be? The next time USAgent gets in the face of an Olympian god should they just snap their fingers and turn him into a rat? Should the limit be that though they can do certain things like transform and summon mortals they have great difficulty doing the same to a god of near equal or greater power? Ex. Zeus could just teleport Apollo to him due to the power difference but Apollo could not teleport Thor to him.

thoughts?


...I absolutely hate it when a character is given a tool, like, say, a magical hammer or a cosmic surfboard, only to learn it's in no way useful or necessary for the character to bother having them. You would kinda wonder whats the point of seeing Surfer always ridding his surf board if it only has cosmetic values (or close to it). Same for Thor whose hammer, going by some posters, is a redundancy of who he is.

Also, when a character, divine or not, has a thematic concept, I expect it to matter. The god of war having the power to grow vegetables or to charm person might be a bit lame. The powers given should respect the portfolio at least minimally. Otherwise, why bother calling him a "god" of something. Just say a "god" period.




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